Why You Feel Tired After Eating

Many people often experience post-meal sleepiness. This is totally normal, and there can be many reasons for this. The food you eat, your meal sizes, your lifestyle, or your body condition can all contribute to your tiredness.

5-Minute Crafts is ready to reveal the truth behind the unexpected sleepiness you experience after you eat a meal.

❗ Important: All the information represented in the article is for informative purposes only. You should always consult with your doctor first.

1. Your meals are loaded with carbs and protein.

Protein-rich foods like turkey, salmon, cheese, soy products, and spinach contain the amino acid tryptophan. This triggers your body to release serotonin, the happiness hormone, that also helps to regulate your sleep. Foods high in carbs, like pasta, rice, white bread, and sugary snacks also contribute to the production of serotonin. If you combine them together, you can end up feeling sleepy after a meal.

2. Your meals might be too big.

Large portions of food can also make you feel drowsy. This is especially common if you eat a lot for lunch at midday. It’s a natural reaction of your body, as your sugar levels rise, and your energy goes down.

3. You might have poor sleep habits.

Not getting enough sleep can lead to post-meal tiredness too. Moreover, when you feel tired, your hunger increases. Because of this, you can crave unhealthy food and overeat. It’s recommended that you improve your bedtime routine by developing a consistent sleep schedule, lowering your stress levels, and including some physical activity in your day.

4. You might not handle some foods well.

Food intolerances and allergies can prevent your body from absorbing antioxidants and other useful elements, causing nutritional deficiencies in your body. This can also contribute to post-meal fatigue. Pay close attention to your body and see if there are other symptoms like upset stomach, cramps, skin irritation, or headaches. Some common food intolerances are:

  • Dairy products: milk, cheese, yogurt
  • Gluten: bread, pasta, cereals, pastries
  • Caffeine: coffee, soda, tea, energy drinks
  • Fructose: fruits and vegetables
  • Eggs
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Beans
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