How to Make Your Pet Take Its Meds: 5 Ways

If you’re looking after a dog or cat that suffers from an illness or disease, you probably have to administer medicine prescribed by your veterinarian on a regular basis. This can be a real challenge since our animals generally reject it because they don’t like the texture or how it tastes.

5-Minute Crafts will show you a few ways to get your pet to take its medicine. Make sure you follow the instructions and specific doses given by the specialist.

Before you start: Keep calm

Both dogs and cats are highly perceptive animals and can sense your anxiety and nervousness.

When visiting the vet and administering pills or syrups, be sure to remain calm. Make your pet feel safe and loved. If your furry friend can play, distract them with their favorite toy. As long as they feel calm and cared for, you’ll be able to achieve your goal.

If you act stressed or uneasy, the animal will feel like they’re in danger. This will make it very difficult for them to want you around, which will make your task of giving them their medication harder.

Method 1: Hide the medicine inside their favorite food.

If you need to give your pet a solid or liquid drug, mix it with their favorite food or treat.

Dogs usually take a bite and swallow it whole. They often don’t even realize that their food has medication in it. Try giving it to them with a meat-flavored broth or embedded in a piece of their favorite protein.

On the other hand, felines are more careful with what they ingest and chew before swallowing. That’s why we recommend inserting the pill into a snack and offering it from the palm of your hand. This will ensure that the medicine is actually swallowed. You can hide it in some yogurt, butter, or cheese spread.

Method 2: Use a thin syringe without a needle.

If your pet spits out the pill instead of eating it with the food, you’ll have to dilute it with a little water and place the mixture in a syringe (without the needle). Do the same in the case of syrup.

  1. Approach the animal slowly, hold its muzzle with one hand, and with the other, gently insert the syringe through the side of the jaw, between its molar teeth. Push it in quickly and press down on his muzzle while keeping his head up to make sure he swallows all the liquid.
  2. When finished, stay with your four-legged friend and pet them as a reward. You can also give them a treat for cooperating and showing good behavior. This will help keep them from trying to hide for the next dose.

Method 3: Powder the meds

Before trying this method, ask the vet if you can do this without spoiling the prescribed dose.

If the above methods don’t work, crush the pill and mix it with a dish that your pet likes, preferably with a creamy consistency so that the powder or tiny pieces adhere to the food.

Keep in mind that some medications are very bitter when chopped and that the taste will alter the food. Your dog or cat will probably not want to go near their food dish. To avoid this, add small pieces of meat or fish as a first layer. Another possible issue is that your pet won’t ingest the entire medication, meaning it won’t be as effective.

Method 4: Apply it to its front legs.

You can apply this method in case your veterinarian has prescribed a gel, cream, or viscous liquid for your pet.

Take the dose indicated by the vet, mix it with some peanut butter or cream cheese, and spread it all over your dog’s or cat’s front paws. Your pets will not resist the urge to lick their limbs clean, as they usually dislike them being dirty.

It is most effective to employ this trick while keeping the animal indoors, in a single room, without access to the yard or street, as it may run away, causing the medicated food to come off and onto the floor.

Method 5: Play with your pet and reward them

We know that most dogs like to play with their favorite humans. You can make the most of this entertaining time by draining their energy, making the pet more docile, and giving them their medicine.

Take your dog for a walk or a run and reward them for their good behavior. Give them a couple of snacks without medicine, and then give him one that does contain the drug. Your dog won’t realize they took their medication.

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